Lindos History



Ayios Georgios Chostos, an inscribed cruciform church with a cupola, is on the northwest edge of the village. In the apse of the sanctuary are five layers of fresco painting belonging to the post-Iconoclast period in the 2nd half of the 12th c., and to post-Byzantine times.

Ayios Georgios Pachymachiotis or Pano. This inscribed cruciform church with a cupola dates to 1394/95 according to an inscription on the south side of the front of the apse. It is decorated with full-figure saints in luxurious attire on the south wall of the church, hierarchs below the arch of the sanctuary and part of a representation of the Ascension in the vault.

Ayios Menas is the same type as Ayios Georgios Chostos. It has interesting late 12th c. frescos which are late Komnene in style but 15th c. in date.

Ayios Demetrios is a small barrel-vaulted church northeast of the entrance to the Acropolis. In a blind apse on its north wall can be seen a 15th c. St Demetrios on horseback.

In the locality of Vigli under the east cliff of the Acropolis the mosaic floor and marble tiling of an Early Christian basilica have been found, dating to the 5th c.

The modern village of Lindos. The entrance to the village is on the north, by its only square, which is now used as a carpark and has a large tree in the middle and a small fountain with many features from the period of the Knights. Rocks behind and above it recall ancient aqueducts. The graveyard is also at the entrance to the village, containing the church of Phaneromeni. A little beyond and below the square are the remains of the Moslem cemetery containing a few graves, whose typical grave markers have been demolished. The school has been moved to the side of the Megalo Yialo and the old building, beside the church of the Panayia, built in the neoclassical style, is now used by a local society for various cultural events.
The streets of Lindos are a maze of continuous buildings, chiefly with interior courtyards. Most of the houses have flat roofs, but some variety of types can be seen among the buildings that have not been affected by time and changes of use and shape. The material used in their construction is either the local quarried poros stone or field stones which have been plastered and whitewashed. The houses of Lindos all have features in common, but they can be divided into different classes: simple ones resembling the country cottages of the island, houses with a courtyard, and mansions.

The most representative mansions are known by the names of their owners: the House of Papakonstantis (1626), of Kyriakos Koliodos, of Lefteris Makris (1700), of Krikis (1700), of Georgios, of Marietta Markoulitsa (1700), of Ioannidis, etc. With the arrival of neoclassicism in Greece at the end of the 19th c, Lindos, Like Rhodes town, adopted some of the new architectural features: large windows facing the street, two-storey houses with tiled saddle roofs and gable ends. The doors in the yard walls have jambs and lintels reminiscent of ancient temples. New houses were also built, which no longer had anything in common with the old mansions.